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  #21  
Old 09-02-2013, 03:37 AM
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Spider Baby or, The Maddest Story Ever Told (1968)
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Witchfinder General (1968)
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Rosemary's Baby (1968)
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Targets (1968)
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Quote:
Its low key story of an aging horror movie star disarming a sniper at a drive in theatre neatly encapsulates the transition from old school to modern horror not only in films of the era, but the world itself at that time.

Peter Bagdonovich burst upon the scene with this film, and after the brilliant The Last Picture Show, he never made another great film. This is also Boris Karloff's last great performance. He fretted over filming the long speech in the hotel room, but after a few stiff drinks with director Bagdonovich, he nailed it in one take.

This low budget masterpiece is a great statement of its times. It IS horror, and it transcends horror. - neverending


Night of the Living Dead (1968)
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The Cremator (aka) Spalovač Mrtvol (1969)
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Quote:
This is not only one of the best movies of the 60's but one of the better horror movies ever made. Not only does it epitomise the era, its one of the finest portrayals of a serial killer ever given.

Rudolf Hrunsinsky puts in an amazing performance as The Cremator - he has this perfect disarming and unassuming look that will remind veiwers of a young Peter Lorre and a voice that is almost soothing to listen to, but from the start you are made aware that there is something so wrong and insidious about this guy.

The movie, while set against the backdrop of the second world war, is purely about the complusive mind of The Cremator. Totally obsessed with his work or what he sees as his duty, every action he takes is about furthering his work and realising his ambitions. What makes The Cremator such a perfect villian is the purety of his thoughts and mind, this is a guy so self obsessed and so single minded that he is prepared to use the Nazi party as a tool to realise his ambition while seeming totally ambivalent to their cause. For The Cremator they are just a tool to further his ambition.

The cinematography from Stanislav Milota is some of the finest work you will ever see, freeze frame at any point in this movie and you will have a beautiful still. Every shot, every scene is beautifully planned and executed. Scenes flow into each other with ease and the story plays out like a waking nightmare. Some of the scenes are amongst the best the genre has to offer.

Dark, atmospheric, visceral portrait of a disturbed mind, categorised as a horror comedy by IMDB, this is horror with a gentle hint of disturb humor, but certainly no comedy. Juraj Herz wrote and directed a masterpiece. There is no doubt in my mind that if this movie had the exposure other movies get or you simply switched the name Juraj Herz for David Lynch on the cover of the movie, this movie would be rightly considered a masterpiece of our genre.

I recommend to all of you that if you ever get the chance to watch this movie (can be found on youtube and now available on DVD after being lost for some 40 years) then take the time to give it a watch. It really is an amazing movie and in an era of great movies it easily stands alongside the best of the era. - Straker
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  #22  
Old 09-02-2013, 04:04 AM
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The SIXTH PERIOD: 1970 - 1979



The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971)
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The Last House on the Left (1972)
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The Exorcist (1973)
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The Wicker Man (1973)
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The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
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Black Christmas (1974)
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Quote:
Black Christmas is often considered the first slasher film. I have even read a book which classified all horror before Black Christmas and all horror after, thus stating that it officially dawned a new era of horror. This fact can not be ignored. Of course, it did not make as much money as Halloween or even The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, but it is still a very worthy contender.
The film has an interesting premise and story. Plus, the acting is pretty good for a film like this. Even the killer (whose identity is never revealed) is intriguing. The film even has a little humor strewn into it. No top 1970s horror list would be complete without this seminal classic. - metternich1815
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  #23  
Old 09-02-2013, 04:33 AM
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Jaws (1975)
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Burnt Offerings (1976)
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The Omen (1976)
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Carrie (1976)
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Suspiria (1977)
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Eraserhead (1977)
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Quote:
Most accessible and mainstream surrealist horror out there. Quality directing from Lynch who really manages to create a legitimate 'dream state' type of movie. Beautifully paranoid feel to the whole movie that just keeps the viewer in that awkward place that makes these types of movies so much fun. One of the few movies I go out of my way to show to friends who haven't seen it. - Straker
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  #24  
Old 09-02-2013, 04:46 AM
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Rabid (1977)
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The Hills Have Eyes (1977)
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When I think of backwoods/redneck/freak type movies this is what I think of. It is a classic of the decade. - The Villain


Dawn of the Dead (1978)
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Halloween (1978)
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Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)
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  #25  
Old 09-02-2013, 05:06 AM
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Phantasm (1979)
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Alien (1979)
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One of my top horror movies of all time, as it follows more of a slasher format, and is also genuinely scary. - Giganticface


The Amityville Horror (1979)
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Zombi 2 (aka) Zombie (1979)
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Salem's Lot (1979)
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Quote:
Tobe Hooper really delivers a 'perfect' horror movie, sure the TV movie style looks a little dated but there are so many iconic moments and scenes that its hard not to love this movie. James Mason puts in a truly amazing performance, the atmosphere is perfect and certain scenes stand amongst the best the genre has to offer. - Straker
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  #26  
Old 09-02-2013, 05:53 AM
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The SEVENTH PERIOD: 1980 - 1989



Cannibal Holocaust (1980)
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Quote:
it's one of the most impactful horror movies I've ever seen. I understand that it's not for everyone, but hopefully it will be judged on its merits and not purely on taste.

Not many exploitation films have made it (because they've been beaten by better films), but this one transcends exploitation via self-satirization and irony. It also serves as a transition from 70s grindhouse to an era of "proper," and generally respectable, horror that took off in the 80s. If you're put off by the real animal killings, which is totally understandable, hopefully the assurance that all the animals were consumed by the natives, as they regularly did, helps alleviate that.

Regarding the film, its story and its execution, I find it to be truly unique and impeccably executed. I'm amazed that the real-life natives are almost better actors than the actors. I have no idea how Deodato accomplished that. It's one of the reasons the movie feels so real. That, and the intermixing of Animal Kingdom-style footage and mondo real death video (which, as part of the storyline, is a "faked" documentary), causes the line between reality and fiction to blur to the point that the viewer is subconsciously confused, and the acted violence becomes significantly more disturbing that it would have been otherwise. This is a stroke of genius by Deodato.

The story is brilliant, consisting of two excursions -- the second team setting out to solve the mystery of the first team's disappearance, a story which is revealed incrementally via footage that the second team found. The footage revealed that the true horror was just as much due to human nature, of which the exploitative and, eventually evil, Westerners are bound to, as it was to the cannibalistic nature of the natives. It should also be mentioned that the found footage aspect of this film predates the "original" found footage film, The Blair Witch Project, by nearly 20 years, and that it was so well executed that Deodato was actually tried in a criminal court for suspicion of killing his actors.

Cannibal Holocaust outdid all of its subgenre predecessors, both in intelligent storytelling and execution, and effectively killed off the cannibal subgenre. After this one, there will never be a need for another one. - Giganticface


The Changeling (1980)
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Quote:
It's amongst the best the 80s has to offer, easily. This is one of the most perfect haunted house movies and is absolutely overflowing with atmosphere and tension. George C. Scott is outstanding and is aided by a fine supporting cast, including the great Melvyn Douglas. The séance scene is probably the best example of a scene that has been recycled countless times in horror. No blood and gore, just pure horror. This one really is a timeless classic that needs to be recognised. The ultimate 'Things that go bump in the night' movie. Full of tension, atmosphere and genuine chills with barely a drop of blood in sight. - Straker


Friday the 13th (1980)
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The Shining (1980)
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Scanners (1981)
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  #27  
Old 09-02-2013, 06:18 AM
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The Howling (1981)
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Best modern reality take on werewolves since The Wolfman. - Sculpt


The Beyond (aka) E tu vivrai nel terrore! L'aldilà (1981)
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Quote:
It's surreal, has some excellent, creative practical gore effects, and spiders that bite people's faces off. I enjoy zombies, but typically they don't scare me. The slow, staring ones in this film do, as does that chick's eyes. Some might not enjoy the non-linear nature of the story, or might consider it nonsensical, which is fair, but for someone that enjoys surrealism and the bizarre, I think it makes more sense than it's often believed to. Even if it didn't, it wouldn't matter. I'd choose the film that had the most impact on me, and this one is it. - Giganticface


An American Werewolf in London (1981)
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The Evil Dead (1981)
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Basket Case (1982)
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Poltergeist (1982)
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  #28  
Old 09-02-2013, 06:41 AM
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  #29  
Old 09-02-2013, 07:08 AM
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Old 09-02-2013, 07:57 AM
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The EIGHTH PERIOD: 1990 - 1999



Nightbreed: The Cabal Cut (1990)
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Quote:
An unique film where the monsters are the good guys and the humans the monsters. A startling conception from Clive Barker. The film as it stands is admittedly flawed, but when The Cabal Cut gets released people are going to see what a powerful, original film this truly is. Having recently seen Nightbreed: The Cabal Cut, the restored version that can only be seen at festivals or conventions, it was truly a mind blowing experience. Barker's best film by far. - neverending


The Exorcist III (1990)
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Jacob's Ladder (1990)
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Misery (1990)
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The Silence of the Lambs (1991)
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